Social sciences have been of great interest to me for most of my life. From my childhood, I was intensely interested in what people did around me. I kept asking my parents, as well as other people, about humanity’s motives, or why individuals would act one way or another, and various statistical data fascinated me. At the age of 13, I published my first scientific article. It was dedicated to racial prejudice in Europe, and from the height of my current experience, I can say that it was replicated research, so to say, but back then it was accepted by my teachers, and it encouraged me to keep on working in this field. When I entered Silverton University, my studies in the social sciences became more specific and scientific. Along with common disciplines, I managed to find time for my own research, and for writing articles on topics which were of interest to me.

At the age of 25, I graduated with a Master’s degree in the field of Social Stratification. I decided to stay at Silverton University, and spent two years as a junior researcher, and after it, as an assistant professor. But I started to feel that the conservative academic environment in my hometown (and moreover, in my home county of Uganda) could not provide me with the necessary atmosphere and research opportunities that I yearned for. Though local sociology journals have published my works, many ideas which I came up with were often criticized and banned by the scientific community. I gradually came to the conclusion that instead of trying to overcome a wall of prejudice, I simply needed to change the surrounding. I looked through a number of educational programs, and found the Fulbright Program.

The Fulbright Program is suitable for me by many criteria. It allows me to conduct my research in a completely new environment and in academic traditions which are completely different from those that I have became conditioned to. Novelties mean new approaches for research–I hope that participating in the Fulbright Program will grant me an opportunity to shift my perspective and take a fresh look at the subjects of my interest. I also plan to benefit from wider opportunities and a more liberal academic environment: I am sure that some of my ideas might be appreciated in the USA with the same readiness as they were rejected at home. My goal for participating in the Fulbright Program is to develop, introduce, and promote alternative ideas about social order without running into unnecessary obstacles caused by people who do not wish to grasp innovative ideas, preferring to stick to theories that outlived themselves.

I hope to find an understanding among the members of the Fulbright Commission and look forward for the decision of the board. Joining the Fulbright Program is my chance to contribute to the development of sociology intrinsically, and to provide a better understanding and management of social processes in particular.

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Joining the Fulbright Program